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How Google Works

The rules for success in the Internet Century

A new book by Eric Schmidt & Jonathan Rosenberg, with Alan Eagle

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How Google Works

The rules for success in the Internet Century

A new book by Eric Schmidt & Jonathan Rosenberg, with Alan Eagle

HOW GOOGLE WORKS is an entertaining, page-turning primer containing lessons that Google Executive Chairman and ex-CEO Eric Schmidt and former SVP of Products Jonathan Rosenberg learned as they helped build the company.

 

In their new book, the authors explain how technology has shifted the balance of power from companies to consumers, and that the only way to succeed in this ever-changing landscape is to create superior products and attract a new breed of multifaceted employees whom Eric and Jonathan dub "smart creatives."

 

Covering topics including corporate culture, strategy, talent, decision-making, communication, innovation, and dealing with disruption, the authors illustrate management maxims with numerous insider anecdotes from Google’s history.

 

In an era when everything is speeding up, the best way for businesses to succeed is to attract smart-creative people and give them an environment where they can thrive at scale. HOW GOOGLE WORKS is a new book that explains how to do just that.

 
"An informative and creatively multilayered Google guidebook from the businessman's perspective."Kirkus
"An energized and exciting primer on creating a company and workforce prepared to meet an inspiring future."Publisher's Weekly
"Chairman Eric Schmidt and exec advisor Jonathan Rosenberg pull back the curtain to reveal how the company created its unique culture of workplace innovation"Fortune

The Authors

 

Eric SchmidtEric Schmidt

Eric served as Google’s CEO from 2001 to 2011. During that time he shepherded the company’s growth from a Silicon Valley start-up to a global technology leader that today has over $55 billion in annual revenues and offices in more than 40 countries. Eric is now Google’s executive chairman.

 

Jonathan RosenbergJonathan Rosenberg

Jonathan joined Google in 2002 and managed the design and development of the company’s consumer, advertiser, and partner products, including Search, Ads, Gmail, Android, Apps, and Chrome. He is currently an advisor to Google CEO Larry Page.

 

Alan EagleAlan Eagle

Alan Eagle has been a Director of Executive Communications at Google since joining the company in 2007. In that role, he led speechwriting and other communication activities for several Google executives, including Eric and Jonathan.

What's happening now

@ericschmidt
19 Dec 2014
RT @jjrosenberg: Appreciate being included on this list. Hope #HowGoogleWorks' 'unconventional approach' helps others succeed! http://t.co/…

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0 favourites | 9 retweets
Jonathan Rosenberg
18 Dec 2014


Appreciate the recognition from +theglobeandmail.com Hope some of the unconventional approaches we learned at Google help others succeed!

http://www.theglobeandmail.com/report-on-business/careers/management/the-top-business-books-of-2014/article22009299/

#HowGoogleWorks

VIEW ON GOOGLE+
+29 | 2 comments | 23 shares
Jonathan Rosenberg
12 Dec 2014


It’s critical to understand is that it wasn’t the company’s culture that drove a team to work through the weekend fixing an issue that had nothing to do with their day jobs. It was the people themselves. 

What the founders did so well was create a culture that attracted the kind of people who were naturally inclined to tackle tough problems, and provide them with an environment where they could thrive. Yes, this took place at Google. But with the right mission, passionate employees, and plenty of freedom and trust, it’s the kind of thing that could happen anywhere.

#HowGoogleWorks



Eric Schmidt originally shared:

Loved this article. What I remember being so impressed with at the time was how little senior management and traditional company hierarchy mattered in all of this. When Larry spotted poorly targeted AdWords ads, he didn’t have to route a message down the chain to the ads people, or wait for a task force to form (in fact, Jonathan and I weren’t even informed until the problem was already solved).

Instead, he knew he could just point out the issue and count on the right people to take care of it because they were as invested in providing a great user experience as he was. That kind of dedication can’t be taught – it comes from having a clear mission, hiring passionate people, and then providing them with the trust and resources they need to do what’s best for the company. #HowGoogleWorks

https://hbr.org/2014/12/the-google-way-of-attacking-problems

#google #culture #mission #passion #hiring

VIEW ON GOOGLE+
+47 | 0 comments | 5 shares
@ericschmidt
09 Dec 2014
RT @GrandCentralPub: #HowGoogleWorks by @EricSchmidt is an @Amazon Gold Box Deal starting now and for the next few hours! http://t.co/LN4Cu…

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0 favourites | 9 retweets
Jonathan Rosenberg
09 Dec 2014


Business week asked what’s missing from their list of the 85 most disruptive ideas. I’d say the biggest thing is cloud computing. A core tenet of #HowGoogleWorks is how fundamentally the internet, mobile, and the cloud have changed the business landscape. By making near infinite storage and computing power and sophisticated tools available at a low cost, the cloud has paved the way for innovation like few things previously. 

I bet that when the 90th anniversary issue comes out, cloud computing will feature prominently on the list. What else do you think will be included in five years?

http://www.businessweek.com/features/85ideas/

www.HowGoogleWorks.net

#disruption #innovation #businessweek #businessweek85

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+85 | 7 comments | 55 shares
Jonathan Rosenberg
09 Dec 2014


We don't usually call these promotions out here, but this title is obviously absolutely worth it. One of the best business and management books of 2014, #HowGoogleWorks by +Jonathan Rosenberg and +Eric Schmidt, is a Gold Box Deal on Amazon right now!

http://www.amazon.com/gp/goldbox/ref=nav_cs_gb?gb_hero_f_102=p:1,c:283155,s:available

VIEW ON GOOGLE+
+12 | 2 comments | 1 shares
@ericschmidt
05 Dec 2014
How to keep top talent? If you love them, let them go (elsewhere within the company). #HowGoogleWorks http://t.co/zDfUkEElzq

VIEW ON TWITTER
127 favourites | 172 retweets
Jonathan Rosenberg
04 Dec 2014


All companies want to attract and retain top talent. But the reality is that smart, talented people learn quickly, get bored easily, and are bombarded by opportunities to go elsewhere. So how do you keep them? Tackling the kind of big challenges that make people feel proud and excited to come to work everyday is one important piece of the puzzle. The other is simpler – make it easy for people to move around within your organization. Doing so is a win-win. The smart creatives get to push themselves and learn something new, and you get to benefit from their energy and expertise.

At Google we encourage this in lots of ways. 20% projects, rotational programs, and the constant moves between teams that go on across the company are all designed to keep people engaged and help them grow. It’s a straightforward tool any company can use give great people a good reason to stick around.

www.HowGoogleWorks.net

#howgoogleworks #talent #google

VIEW ON GOOGLE+
+82 | 12 comments | 92 shares
Jonathan Rosenberg
03 Dec 2014


Many entrepreneurs focus their energy on coming up with a brilliant idea, assuming that everything else will fall into place once they have that figured out. But what so many miss is that the idea is only the first step. What separates the good ideas that become great products from those that remain ideas is the team involved.

Ed Catmull nails this point in Creativity, Inc. when he says: “give a good idea to a mediocre team, and they will screw it up. Give a mediocre idea to a great team, and they will either fix it or come up with something better.” 

Big, clever ideas are important for inspiring and attracting the best people, but it’s the team you build that will truly determine your success.

www.HowGoogleWorks.net

#HowGoogleWorks #google

VIEW ON GOOGLE+
+60 | 3 comments | 28 shares
Jonathan Rosenberg
02 Dec 2014


Pleased to see How Google Works featured on Amazon’s Secrets of Success holiday gift list. Sometimes all a budding entrepreneur needs is a little encouragement and some practical advice, and How Google Works is really written to provide both. To round out your entrepreneurial gift pack, I also recommend Ed Catmull and Amy Wallace’s “Creativity, Inc.” and Peter Thiel’s “Zero to One,” which are both good reads with unique perspectives on starting something new.

Any other books you’d give to a newly hatched entrepreneur to help them succeed?

#HowGoogleWorks #holidays #gifts

http://goo.gl/PlpZq5

www.HowGoogleWorks.net

VIEW ON GOOGLE+
+24 | 2 comments | 10 shares
Jonathan Rosenberg
27 Nov 2014


One of the core themes of How Google Works is the importance of great people. I can personally attest that the book itself simply wouldn’t have been possible without the help of a large number of them. So in the spirit of Thanksgiving, I wanted to take a moment to express my gratitude.

So many people had a hand in this book. Mentors like Bill Campbell, and Professor Susan Feigenbaum. Smart creatives like +Brian Rakowski +Clay Bavor +Keval Desai +Marissa Mayer and +Cathay Bi My loving and supportive family. And of course everyone who read it and offered their feedback. I feel privileged to have so many smart, talented people in my life and interested in my work, and can’t thank you enough for all that you do.

Happy Thanksgiving!

#HowGoogleWorks

VIEW ON GOOGLE+
+57 | 7 comments | 8 shares
@ericschmidt
27 Nov 2014
The real authors of #HowGoogleWorks are all the great people who inspired us along the way. Thank you for all you do & Happy Thanksgiving!

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63 favourites | 41 retweets
@ericschmidt
26 Nov 2014
RT @jjrosenberg: Nice piece in the @NewYorker. Flattered to have #HowGoogleWorks mentioned with Sloan&Drucker! http://t.co/cfB2kesfgk http:…

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0 favourites | 64 retweets
Jonathan Rosenberg
25 Nov 2014


Thought-provoking piece from +The New Yorker  on the evolution of the business management book over the past half century. It’s beyond flattering to have How Google Works mentioned alongside important tomes like Sloan’s “My Years with General Motors,” and Drucker’s “Concept of the Corporation.” I’m as curious as the author whether the lessons +Eric Schmidt and +Alan Eagle and I learned at Google will still be applicable 50 years from now, or whether new technology and a changed landscape will require a wholly different way of doing things.

What’s your take? What do you think the next business management book on the shelf will say?

http://goo.gl/C4Jexz

www.HowGoogleWorks.net

#HowGoogleWorks #google #business #management

VIEW ON GOOGLE+
+103 | 11 comments | 98 shares
Jonathan Rosenberg
24 Nov 2014


Google is famous for its launch and iterate approach to product development. The launch part is pretty straightforward; what’s more complicated is what happens next. Since you can’t afford to iterate on everything, how do you decide where to focus?

The natural tendency is to devote more resources to the products that appear to need some help – improving the user experience and investing in marketing to reach a broader audience. But at Google, we’ve found that to be exactly the wrong approach. Instead, the best thing to do is to find the products that are doing well on their own, and then fuel the fire with marketing and engineering resources.

If you’re interested in hearing more about this, listen in to my conversation with +VentureBeat’s What to Think podcast here: http://goo.gl/V6fgv0

www.HowGoogleWorks.net

#HowGoogleWorks #google

VIEW ON GOOGLE+
+57 | 7 comments | 30 shares
Jonathan Rosenberg
21 Nov 2014


The best thing any company can do for itself is to hire smart people. But it’s also important to think about the composition of your company as a whole. Hiring too homogeneous a group can leave you open to blind spots, with important issues overlooked and valuable opportunities left unidentified. The best defense against this? Hire people from diverse backgrounds and make sure their voices are heard.

We work hard to do this at Google, but know that we aren’t where we want to be, particularly when it comes to women and minorities. It’s a problem you see throughout the working world, and one that’s particularly acute in the tech industry. There’s no shortage of smart, creative people of all different backgrounds out there with big ideas and the ability to become great technologists, and we’d like to help them on their path. That’s why I’m pleased to share that we’re donating all profits from How Google Works to organizations focused on improving access to computer science education for girls and minority youth including +Black Girls Code, +Girls Who Code, and Code 2040.


More thoughts on hiring at: www.HowGoogleWorks.net

#HowGoogleWorks #google #hiring #diversity



Eric Schmidt originally shared:

I’m pleased to share that we’re donating all profits from How Google Works to organizations focused on improving access to computer science education for girls and young minorities, including +Black Girls CODE  , +Girls Who Code  , and +CODE2040  .

The best thing any company can do for itself is hire smart people. But it’s also important to think about the composition of your company as a whole. Hiring too homogeneous a group can leave you open to blind spots, with important issues overlooked and valuable opportunities left unidentified. The best defense against this? Hire people from diverse backgrounds and make sure their voices are heard.

We work hard to do this at Google, but know that we aren’t where we want to be, particularly when it comes to women and minorities. It’s a problem you see throughout the working world, and one that’s particularly acute in the tech industry. There’s no shortage of smart, creative people of all different backgrounds out there with big ideas and the ability to become great technologists, and we’d like to help them on their path.

More thoughts on hiring at: www.HowGoogleWorks.net

#HowGoogleWorks #google #hiring #diversity

VIEW ON GOOGLE+
+50 | 4 comments | 5 shares
@ericschmidt
21 Nov 2014
Best defense against business myopia? Diversity. Thrilled to donate all profits from #HowGoogleWorks to CS education for girls & minorities.

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112 favourites | 102 retweets
Jonathan Rosenberg
19 Nov 2014


The rapid pace of change and steady stream of innovation makes today an exciting time to be in business. But with so much going on, it can be difficult to know where to focus. 

Over the last couple years, my friend +Keval Desai  and I have gathered up a collection of research that we feel does a good job of highlighting important trends and offering interesting perspectives. It’s nothing fancy, but we do update it regularly and try to use a discerning eye when deciding what to include. We also emphasize content that is freely available on the web. If you’re interested in getting a window into what the two of us are thinking and reading, take a look here: http://goo.gl/3grLbw

Also feel free to suggest documents we should link to that you have found or let us know when new things come up.

More on the business landscape at: www.HowGoogleWorks.net

#HowGoogleWorks #business #trends #internet

VIEW ON GOOGLE+
+100 | 7 comments | 39 shares
Jonathan Rosenberg
18 Nov 2014


Barriers to entry and the cost of experimentation have never been lower, and new technologies are being created more quickly than people can figure out what to do with them. It’s the perfect environment to start a new venture. So if there’s an idea that’s been buzzing around your head, now’s the time to take that risk. The future really is yours to reinvent.

#HowGoogleWorks



Eric Schmidt originally shared:

Easy access to information? Check. Cheap, reliable ways to connect with people all over the world? Check. Simple tools to help you try, fail, and try again? Check. There’s never been a better time to be a smart creative. So what are you waiting for?

www.HowGoogleWorks.net

#HowGoogleWorks #google

VIEW ON GOOGLE+
+75 | 4 comments | 0 shares
@ericschmidt
15 Nov 2014
Crazy ideas inspire the best people. And with the best people on them, they aren’t so crazy anymore. #HowGoogleWorks http://t.co/SamkT2OoeW

VIEW ON TWITTER
200 favourites | 239 retweets
Jonathan Rosenberg
15 Nov 2014


As Astro Teller, the head of Google X, likes to remind people, if you want to build a car that gets 10% better mileage, you just need to tweak the current design. But if you want to build a car that gets 10x better mileage, you need to start over and dream up something new. You may not actually end up with a car that gets 500 miles to a gallon, but let’s say you get part of the way there. By re-imagining how a car could run, you’ll have accomplished something far more significant than you would have had you focused on the incremental goal.

Read on for more on why big goals lead to better solutions than practical ones: http://www.fastcompany.com/3037573/why-your-realistic-goals-are-holding-you-back

www.HowGoogleWorks.net

#HowGoogleWorks #google #10x #googlex

VIEW ON GOOGLE+
+119 | 14 comments | 72 shares
@ericschmidt
14 Nov 2014
Write the job description for your ideal job in 5 years. Ask what you’re missing to get there. Voila! A career plan. #HowGoogleWorks

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501 favourites | 496 retweets
Jonathan Rosenberg
13 Nov 2014


One of the fun parts of the How Google Works book tour has been the opportunity to talk to younger people about their careers.

Something I always recommend doing is to write the job description for your ideal job in five years. Include all the pertinent details – role, responsibilities, location, salary – everything you would need to know to apply. Then fast forward five years and imagine you’re in that job. What does your resume look like? Write it out so that you have a sense of what you’ll need to do to get to where you want to be.

And if you already feel prepared for the job with the skills and experiences you have today, then you probably aren’t thinking big enough about what you could achieve!

More career advice in the book at: www.HowGoogleWorks.net

#HowGoogleWorks #google #career #advice

VIEW ON GOOGLE+
+63 | 3 comments | 59 shares
Jonathan Rosenberg
12 Nov 2014


If you’ve had a chance to read How Google Works, what did you find insightful, and where do you wish we’d spent more time? Any points that you flat out disagree with? It’s meant to be a conversation starter, so I’m interested to hear what you think!

#HowGoogleWorks



Eric Schmidt originally shared:

We’ve heard great things about How Google Works, but received our share of criticism, as well. In the spirit of welcoming that criticism, here’s our +New York Times book review. If you’ve read the book, I’m interested in your take. What did we get right, and where did we go wrong? Feedback is a gift, so please, be candid!

http://www.nytimes.com/2014/11/09/books/review/how-google-works-by-eric-schmidt-and-jonathan-rosenberg.html?_r=0

#HowGoogleWorks #google #reviewyourself

VIEW ON GOOGLE+
+31 | 4 comments | 2 shares
Jonathan Rosenberg
12 Nov 2014


Pretty much every company has a slogan or mission statement. But what makes for a good one? It’s not about length, catchy wording or even originality. The key is authenticity. Powerful mission statements aren’t just posted around the office, they’re actually referenced when big decisions are being made.

At Google, one of our most important is “Focus on the user.” When faced with ambiguous data and conflicting opinions, the deciding factor is always what’s in the user’s best interest (vs. that of the advertiser, partner, or even Google). It serves as a clear guiding light for all employees to ensure that their actions align with Google’s core values, diffusing authority throughout the company.

So take a look at your company’s mission and slogan. Do they embody the principles you actually practice when making decisions? Would they help someone faced with a tough call figure out the right thing to do? If not, it’s probably time to rethink them.

More on defining company culture here: http://www.slideshare.net/ericschmidt/how-google-works-final-1

#HowGoogleWorks #google #business #mission

VIEW ON GOOGLE+
+63 | 6 comments | 17 shares
@ericschmidt
07 Nov 2014
In our book, we say to listen to (and encourage) critics. That should include critics of our book! http://t.co/e7QCthDLOM #HowGoogleWorks

VIEW ON TWITTER
44 favourites | 37 retweets
@ericschmidt
07 Nov 2014
RT @jjrosenberg: Every great athlete has a coach, every business person should have one too! #HowGoogleWorks http://t.co/o7o64dzShG http://…

VIEW ON TWITTER
0 favourites | 87 retweets
"The only way for businesses to consistently succeed is to attract the best smart creatives and create an environment where they can thrive at scale."
"Businesses should be built on a strong set of strategic principles, not an MBA-style plan that’s bound to fail."
"When considering candidates for a role, favor the ones with a track record of learning new things over the ones with a track record in that particular role."
"Think 10X, not 10%. Global scale is available to just about everyone. But too many people are stuck in the old, limited mindset."
"It’s very hard to completely fail when you think big, since you can always salvage something of value from a project with big goals."
 
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How Google Works - The rules for success in the Internet Century